Terminology

A Footballing Glossary explaining everything you might get shouted at you during a game.

Goalside

Switch, Switch it

Line, Go Line

Man-on

Time

I’ve got three

Who are you on?

One of you

Simon’s Golden Guide to Offside


Term:
Goalside

Definition:

Said when you are defending when you need to position yourself between the attacking player and your goal you. This puts you in a position to stop the attacking player from taking a shot on goal. When marking an attacker you should always try to be goalside to her.

Useful Diagrams:



Term:
Switch, Switch it

Definition:

Play the ball over to the opposite side of the field you are on as it is likely that there is more space over there.
Useful if like me you cannot tell the difference between left and right.

Useful Diagrams:



Term:
Line, Go Line

Definition:

Play the ball up the line to the awaiting winger

Useful Diagrams:



Term:
Man-on

Definition:

If you have the ball and this is shouted it means there is at least one player running up to tackle
you so you need to be ready to pass or move with the ball

Useful Diagrams:



Term:
Time

Definition:

The opposite of man-on, it means you have space to think about your next pass or move

Useful Diagrams:



Term:
I’ve got n (where n is any number between 1 and 11)

Definition:

Someone is telling you that they have n people to mark and have spotted you wandering about
not really doing anything so please can you come over and help out (preferably before the corner/throw-in/free kick is taken)

Useful Diagrams:



Term:
Who are you on? or Mark Up
Definition:

A universal term meaning that the other team are attacking and you need to make sure you are marking someone,
preferably not someone who is being marked already though as that will just confuse everybody

Useful Diagrams:



Term:
One of you!

Definition:

Generally yelled when we start playing like kids do in the playground, this shout is aimed to stop bunching around the ball and tackling of teammates

Useful Diagrams:


Finally last but not least…

Simon’s Golden Guide to Offside

Why we have it:

Offside is primarily there to prevent a striker standing permanently in the oppositions penalty box (what we called a goal moocher or goal hanger when we were kids!)
to score easy goals when the defence moves up the pitch. So to stop this, the offside rule was introduced.

What the rule is:

An attacking player is offside when, in their opponents half, the ball is played to them while they are nearer to the opponents goal than ANY 2 or more opposing players.
I.E. if there is a goalkeeper and a defender in front of, or level with, the attacker, when the ball is played to them – like this:

they are not offside!

BUT: If there is only 1 opposing player in front of the attacker:

then you are offside and I will shout rude remarks at you. (Step forward Emily & Zoe).

NB: Some people have heard that if you are not interfering with play you can’t be offside.
For our purposes, if you are lying in a heap with your foot/leg 3 yards away then you aren’t interfering. Otherwise you are.

Exceptions to the rule:

1. THROW INS. You cannot be offside from a throw in BUT ONLY IF THE BALL IS THROWN TO YOU.
So for example, if the entire opposition defence push up, and Karis legs it up the line, and Janet throws the ball straight to her, she is NOT offside.

2. PASSES BY THE OPPOSITION. If an attacker is in a position that would be offside (like the 2nd diagram above), but there is a pass to the goalkeeper by the oppostion instead,
then it is not offside. It is a balls up by the opposition and I would should rude remarks at them if I was their manager.

Not an exception to the rule:

Whatever else you might have heard, you CAN be offside from a free kick. So don’t do it.